That obscure object of the author’s desire

21 Aug
Proust MS (a)

From draft of A la recherche du temps perdu.

Three and half years ago on this blog I wrote about Adam Phillips’ book ‘Missing Out’, which explains how not getting what you think you want might actually be what you want. In the current issue of the LRB, Phillips reviews a new biography of Proust (Proust: The Search, by Benjamin Taylor), and we discover that for the author of A la recherche, the act of desire is what matters, not the attainment of the object of desire. Maybe we shouldn’t bother with trying to fulfil our desires, or achieve our dreams: maybe the beauty of harbouring a desire is simply that – it fills our hearts and minds while it is a potentiality, but the moment we achieve it, win it, possess it (in Proust’s diction), its lustre falls away and we are, more often than not, left bereft, and in mourning for something we we never truly possessed. In other words, the slow burn of unfulfilment is preferable to fulfilment itself.

In the review, Phillips writes:

‘Marcel often intimates with his preachy irony, that we should actually work as hard as we can not to get what we think we want. We do this automatically, it seems, but we need to put our minds to it, because the one belief we appear to be unable to give up on is the belief in the importance of satisfaction. We can’t think what else to do with our wishes other than try to satisfy them.’

And furthermore:

‘The desire to make your dreams come true is a fatal misunderstanding. You have to find something you really want to do and find ways of not doing it. You have to find someone you really want in order to get over wanting them.’

But here’s the interesting part: what is being ‘reached for’ in Proust – the obscure object of the author’s desire, if you will –  is, according to Phillips the invisible book within the book – the one that is being described in the writing, and which is and is not the book that we are reading.

Phillips expresses the idea as follows:

‘. . .Proust’s readers never get to read the book Marcel is going to write; we only get to read the book about the book he may write. Marcel’s book, as opposed to Proust’s, is an emblematic object of desire; we are curious about it, but we can never have access to it.’

Let me elaborate: in Proust’s book, the character of ‘Marcel’ describes himself as writing a book, or as wanting to write a book, which describes the social world with which he is obsessed. ‘Marcel’, needless to say, is a fiction – composed as an adjunct or alternative to the ‘real’ Proust. The book the fictional Marcel is writing will never be written or read. It is the invisible book at the heart of Proust’s fiction. Not the book we hold before us, but its shadow. In another sense, it is the book that Proust ‘desired’ to write, rather than the book he in fact wrote. What resonance this has in marking the distinction between the books we set out to write, the books we might have written, and the books we actually complete; the books we experience as unfulfilled desire, and the books which are, however unsatisfactorily, ‘fulfilled’.

3 Responses to “That obscure object of the author’s desire”

  1. pereppons August 21, 2016 at 10:52 #

    Gràcies Richard, interessant reflexió: el desitj i el fer amb si mateix.

    2016-08-21 3:08 GMT-07:00 Ricardo Blancos Blog :

    > richardgwyn publicó:” Three and half years ago on this blog I wrote about > Adam Phillips’ book ‘Missing Out’, which explains how not getting what you > think you want might actually be what you want. In the current issue of > LRB, Phillips reviews a new biography of Proust (Prous” > Responder a esta entrada realizando el comentario sobre esta línea > Entrada nueva en *Ricardo Blanco’s Blog* > That obscure object of the > author’s desire > by > richardgwyn > > [image: Proust MS (a)] > > From draft of *A la recherche du temps perdu.* > > Three and half years ago on this blog I wrote about Adam Phillips’ book > ‘Missing Out’, which explains how not getting what you think you want might > actually be what you want. In the current issue of LRB, Phillips reviews a > new biography of Proust (Proust: The Search, by Benjamin Taylor), and we > discover that for the author of *A la recherche*, the act of desire is > what matters, not the attainment of the object of desire. Maybe we > shouldn’t bother with trying to fulfil our desires, or achieve our dreams: > maybe the beauty of harbouring a desire is simply that – it fills our > hearts and minds while it is a potentiality, but the moment we achieve it, > win it, *possess* it (in Proust’s diction), its lustre falls away and we > are, more often than not, left bereft, and in mourning for something we we > never truly possessed. In other words, the slow burn of unfulfilment is > preferable to fulfilment itself. > >

  2. Jeannine August 21, 2016 at 19:34 #

    Lovely writing thank you…
    In James Hillman’s essay “Pothos: the Nostalgia of the Puer Eternus,” he speaks of pothos as being “the spiritual component of love or the erotic component of spirit,” and that it is “the longing towards the unattainable, the ungraspable, the incomprehensible.”

    Plato said that Eros can lead us on a ‘ladder of love,’ in which divine ideas are awakened in us through partaking of physical beauty. But many times we become attached to the thing of beauty itself. The answer, however, is not to be found there. The longing points us towards something ineffable….or something like that.

    • richardgwyn August 21, 2016 at 21:33 #

      Thanks Jeannine. I remember Hillman’s essay but from a long time ago. I will probably need to read it again now!

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