A Vagabond

18 Feb

vagabundo

The gentleman depicted here is a vagabond, from the Latin vagari, to wander.

In English the term has almost disappeared in its original sense, although a quick internet search identifies the popularity of the term to help sell niche products, for example: a wine shop in London’s West End; a Swedish shoe manufacturer; an chic boutique in Philadelphia.

A Spanish Wikipedia entry on the word vagabundo (vagabond) begins like this:

“A vagabond is a lazy or idle person who wanders from one place to another, having neither a job, nor income, nor a fixed address. It is a type familiar from Castilian literature, which contains many examples of vagabond pícaros . . .

In the dialect of Lunfardo, which originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries among the lower classes of Buenos Aires, the term ciruja is applied to vagabonds who collect rubbish and sort through it in search of something useful. The term derives from the word for a surgeon, cirujano. Popular wisdom has it that these vagabonds were compared to surgeons because of the way in which they carefully sought out objects of interest, picking them from trash containers and municipal tips, rather than from inside a human body. This last attribute – the meticulous extraction of some unexpected treasure from amid the rejected dross of the everyday – seems rather fitting.

In French chanson, vagabonds are typically depicted as materially impoverished characters possessed of an irresistible allure. The singer Lucienne Delyle (1917-62), one of the most popular French singers of the 1950s (her greatest hit was Mon amant de Saint-Jean) also had a song called Chanson vagabonde, which can be heard here.

 

 

 

 

4 Responses to “A Vagabond”

  1. kathrynamonett February 18, 2014 at 23:28 #

    Romanticized vagabonds in music…

    a la Disney.

    • richardgwyn February 19, 2014 at 19:06 #

      Thanks so much Kathryn. I think chanson is the place for vagabonds though. That and Greek Rebetika.

      • Kathryn Amonett February 27, 2014 at 12:12 #

        You mean chanson is where you prefer them to be because it fits with your particular aesthetic of vagabondage.
        You can’t dictate ‘the place’ for vagabonds in song anymore than you can dictate the place of vagabonds themselves.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Etymology of vagabondage | Ricardo Blanco's Blog - February 27, 2014

    […] an earlier post I referred to the cirujas of Buenos Aires, otherwise known as cartoneros, those nocturnal […]

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