Of Frida Kahlo, Diego (and Dylan)

25 Apr

Frida self portrait

 

I have always been slightly worried by Frida Kahlo, perhaps it taps into some source of generalised male guilt, not for things that I have done myself – at least not intentionally, but that might be the very point – but for all the wrongs perpetrated by the men of the world against the women of the world since time began. And yet for all that, Frida does not come across as a victim: she made decisions, and tried to stick with them in spite of the disasters that overtook her (she said once that her life had been defined for her by two disasters: the first was being involved in an horrendous traffic accident when she was 18, the second was meeting Diego Rivera). She was also – and the two things, suffering and greatness, do not always go together – a great artist, independently of Diego, and the passage of time has probably elevated her to a higher position than him in the hierarchy, if not of ‘greatness’, at least of fame, since being adopted as a feminist icon (what a horrible term, I apologise for using it, but this collocation is always employed in reference to Frida, and a blog, for me, is a place of first drafts, which may or may not be developed and refined for publication elsewhere and at a later date).

So yesterday I tried to immerse myself in Frida’s life; took a trip to the twin houses/studios where she lived in San Angél – in separate buildings, connected by a footbridge – with and without Diego, and where I watched a film about her life; and then down to Coyoacán and the blue house that was her parental home, and where she eventually settled (Leon Trotsky was famously one of the houseguests).

I am not going to write in any depth about Frida’s work here: I am not sufficiently knowledgeable, and besides, there is plenty of stuff out there, but I was profoundly moved – almost to tears – by visiting her house, by seeing her instantly recognisable paintings, the extraordinary collection of Mexican votive miniatures she collected, and the clothes she designed (including the painful-looking contraptions she was forced to wear as a result of her deforming accident). There was a queue outside and it had clouded over when I arrived, a straggle of beggars and street people selling wooden toys added to a growing sense of misery. Inside I didn’t feel like taking photos, certainly not of paintings that can be seen in any catalogue of her work, although this didn’t seem to bother the large man with the ipad who barged his way to prime spot in each room, holding his device before him like a weapon, an irony if there there was one. I did however take a picture of a poster designed by Frida of the inter-uterine development of a human child, as this seemed highly appropriate to her personal story (she suffered numerous miscarriages). As I left the house I walked into a brief downpour. It seemed to fit. I was impressed by Frida’s resilience but ultimately saddened by the story of her life, and while I am not all encouraged by much that Mexico is doing for its women (the Ciudad Juarez femicides still stand out as one of the greatest unresolved crimes of recent history), it is good that there are places like this to reflect on the way that one individual can translate her own suffering into such a universal and powerful creative statement.

On a lighter note, I was struck in passing, while visiting the studios of Diego and Frida (his is still intact, hers is used a gallery for the work of contemporary artists) by the resemblance between Diego Rivera and Dylan Thomas. There is that whole 1940s things about their style and appearance, and something about the lips. That and the fact that both artists are widely known by their first names only. The similarity can only be glanced from certain perspectives, but for me at least, it is noteworthy.

Diego

Diego Rivera

Dylan

Dylan Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And with their respective long-suffering spouses:

Diego and Frida

Diego and Frida

 

Dylan and Caitlin

Dylan and Caitlin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skeletons in Diego Rivera's studio, San Angél

Skeletons in Diego Rivera’s studio, San Angél

 

Diego Rivera's studio

Diego Rivera’s studio

Diego's house from veranda of Frida's house, San Angél.

Diego’s house from veranda of Frida’s house, San Angél.

Frida's house, showing connecting bridge to Diego's house

Frida’s house, showing connecting bridge to Diego’s house

San Angél

San Angél.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

frida_kahlo_frente

Frida Kahlo Museo, Coyoacan.

 

 

Frida Kahlo's design tracking interuterine life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Responses to “Of Frida Kahlo, Diego (and Dylan)”

  1. Iwan Bala April 25, 2014 at 20:08 #

    Great stuff Ricardo!

  2. richardgwyn April 26, 2014 at 02:39 #

    Thanks Iwan, and for the previous. This city is exhausting.

  3. Pere Peñaranda April 26, 2014 at 17:44 #

    Thanks for letting me know about this artist and comment suffering of women in the world.

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